CIS Critical Security Controls

In the earlier post, we discussed CIS Security Benchmarks and how it can be useful to public or private organizations. In this post, we will explore some of the CIS Critical Security Controls.

The CIS Critical Security Controls, also known as CIS Controls, are a concise, prioritized set of cyber practices created to stop today’s most pervasive and dangerous cyber attacks. The CIS controls are developed, refined and validated by a community of leading experts around the world. Though it’s widely considered that by applying top 5 CIS controls, an organization should be able to reduce 85 percents of risk related to cyberattack, we will review all 20 CIS controls here for clarity sake.

  1. CSC # 1: Inventory of Authorized and Unauthorized Device
  2. CSC # 2: Inventory of Authorized and Unauthorized Software
  3. CSC # 3: Secure Configurations for Hardware and Software
  4. CSC # 4: Continuous Vulnerability Assessment and Remediation
  5. CSC # 5: Controlled Use of Administrative Privileges
  6. CSC # 6: Maintenance, Monitoring, and Analysis of Audit Logs
  7. CSC # 7: Email and Web Browser Protections
  8. CSC # 8: Malware Defenses
  9. CSC # 9: Limitation and Control of Network Ports
  10. CSC # 10: Data Recovery Capability
  11. CSC # 11: Secure Configurations for Network Devices
  12. CSC # 12: Boundary Defense
  13. CSC # 13: Data Protection
  14. CSC # 14: Controlled Access Based on the Need to Know
  15. CSC # 15: Wireless Access Control
  16. CSC # 16: Account Monitoring and Control
  17. CSC # 17: Security Skills Assessment and Appropriate Training to Fill Gaps
  18. CSC # 18: Application Software Security
  19. CSC # 19: Incident Response and Management
  20. CSC # 20: Penetration Tests and Red Team Exercises

Each of these controls has its own sub-control, which has it’s own threshold metrics (from Low Risk, Medium Risk, or High Risk). For example, our first control states that we should have an inventory of authorized and unauthorized devices. First sub-control requires us to deploy an “automated” asset inventory discovery tool and as a part of that our metric should be How many “Unauthorized” Devices present in our network at a given time. If that number is somewhere between 0-1%, that’s considered Low Risk. If that number is between 1-4%, it’s medium risk while anything above 4% is considered High Risk – and appropriate actions should be taken to mitigate such risks!